Blog

Chris Gannon is an interactive designer, illustrator and animator. You can find all his news and updates here.

Ask a UXpert on the Adobe Design Blog

Illustration credit:  Justin Cheong

Illustration credit: Justin Cheong

I was asked to contribute to a recent article entitled ‘Animation Best Practices for Avoiding Common Mistakes’ on the Adobe Design Blog, where, as the title succinctly implies, we discuss common animation mistakes in UI motion design (full disclosure: I have made most of these mistake at some point or another).

The UI animation mock-up I designed for the article. Whilst there is a fair bit of animation going on, each animation means something and guides your eye in a linear fashion whilst supporting the user’s interaction.

The UI animation mock-up I designed for the article. Whilst there is a fair bit of animation going on, each animation means something and guides your eye in a linear fashion whilst supporting the user’s interaction.

Don’t Animate All The Things

Animating with restraint is a skill in itself and the saying ‘less is more’ must be kept in mind at all times. I’ve been doing my job now for over 20 years so I feel I can now call myself a seasoned professional in web animation and interactive UI motion design.

Yet I still find myself falling into the same traps and I am still learning to be far more critical of my work, remembering to focus on the people who will be using my designs and ensuring I leave my ego at the door, right next to my need to show off.

I work, as many of us do, in an area where if you’ve done your job properly, nobody notices. It’s a bitter pill to swallow but it’s part of the territory. It’s also a core reason why over-animating/over-designing/over-anything is still prevalent; we really need users to see how good we are so we add in way too much ‘stuff’ . This annoys people, ironically, and has the exact opposite effect.

Gaaah.